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The latest news of specific interest to UKHMA Members including Association News:
 MCA -Unmaned Aerial Vehicals
Added: 15 Jul 2019
The Maritime & Coastguard Agency are inviting tenders for the following Drone Demonstration and Development Project.

The procurement will enable the MCA to assess the potential use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to augment current and future aerial surveillance capability by reducing, enhancing or replacing existing delivery methods.

It will seek to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of MCA operations whilst reducing the risk to MCA personnel. The key deliverable the MCA aims to achieve from a drone demonstration and development contract is to address and remove the regulatory issues and barriers to allow Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) flight in unsegregated and uncontrolled UK airspace.
The resulting evidence will support any recommendation for the employment of drones and provide evidence for the value for money argument of an operational capability.

Contract value - up to £990,000 over 18 months
 
 EMSA - AUTONOMOUS SHIPS STUDY
Added: 15 Jul 2019
The European Maritime Safety Agency is currently tendering for a study into Unmanned Autonomous Vessels;
The tender requirements shall undertake a study of the Risks and Regulatory Issues of Specific Cases of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (SAFEMASS).

The main objective of the study is to provide meaningful input to the EU Member States and possibly IMO on the on-going Regulatory Scoping Exercise (RSE) by identifying the emerging risks and regulatory gaps that are posed by the implementation of the different degrees of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS).
It is expected that information from other research or industry projects is used when necessary while avoiding duplication of the work in a meaningful manner. EMSA intends to conclude a service contract for the provision of a study in two part, with 3 deliverables. The delivery of the first and second reports shall be made within 5 months from the signature of the contract while the delivery of the third report within 8 months from the signature of the contract
Contract Value - Euro 250,000
 
 Ambitious targets to cut shipping emissions
Added: 12 Jul 2019
The Department for Transport reports;

zero-emission capable ships to be in UK waters by 2025, competition launched to spark innovation in clean maritime technology
clean maritime plan part of long-term strategy to keep UK as world leader in maritime sector.

All new ships for UK waters ordered from 2025 should be designed with zero-emission capable technologies, in ambitious plans set out by Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani to cut pollution from the country’s maritime sector.

The commitment is set out in the Clean maritime plan published today (11 July 2019). The government is also looking at ways to incentivise the transition to zero-emission shipping and will consult on this next year.
The plan also includes a £1 million competition to find innovative ways to reduce maritime emissions and is published alongside a call for evidence to reduce emissions on UK waterways and domestic vessels.

The clean maritime plan is part of the government’s Clean Air Strategy, which aims to cut down air pollution across all sectors to protect public health and the environment.
It will also help deliver the United Kingdom’s commitment to be net zero on greenhouse gases by 2050.

Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said:
Our maritime sector is vital to the success of the UK’s economy, but it must do everything it can to reduce emissions, improve air quality and tackle climate change.
The clean maritime plan sets an ambitious vision for the sector and opens up exciting opportunities for innovation. It will help make the UK a global hub for new green technologies in the maritime sector.
The maritime sector has already taken significant strides to reduce emissions – hybrid ferries are already being used in UK waters, including in the Scottish islands and on cross-Solent journeys to the Isle of Wight.

The Port of London Authority – where the Maritime Minister launched the plan today – also uses hybrid vessels.
Guidance has also today been issued to ports to assist them in developing air quality strategies.
This will both address their own operations and support improving air quality across the country.

A further consultation to increase the uptake of low carbon fuels will also take place next year.
The clean maritime plan is part of the government’s Maritime 2050, a long-term strategy published in January 2019 to keep the UK as a world leader in the maritime sector for decades to come.

Maritime media enquiries
Media enquiries
020 7944 3021
 
 UK Clean maritime plan
Added: 12 Jul 2019
Shipping Minister Nusrat Ghani MP;

I am today (11 July 2019) announcing the publication of the clean maritime plan, the UK’s route map to clean growth for the maritime sector and pathway to zero-emission shipping.

The UK has one of the world’s proudest and most innovative maritime heritages. In January 2019, government launched Maritime 2050, a landmark strategy setting out our vision for the future of the British maritime sector.

The Clean maritime plan is the environment route map of Maritime 2050. It identifies ways to tackle air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions in parallel while securing clean growth opportunities for the UK.
A cleaner shipping industry will help make the air we breathe cleaner and safer, and create a healthy environment for the future.
It builds on the role the UK played as a leading voice in advocating for an ambitious global target to reduce greenhouse gases from shipping.

The initial greenhouse strategy agreed by the International Maritime Organization in 2018, set a target to reduce GHGs from international shipping by at least 50% by 2050 and to phase them out completely as soon as possible in this century.
By publishing the clean maritime plan, the UK becomes one of the first countries since the agreement of this initial strategy to publish a national action plan.
The plan is also the first cohesive national strategy to reduce domestic shipping emissions, as part of our journey to meeting net zero.
A global transition to clean shipping is taking place, presenting significant opportunities for economic growth.

Research undertaken for the government suggests the global market for maritime emission reduction technologies could reach £11 billion per year by 2050, potentially resulting in economic benefits to the UK of £510 million per year.
To capitalise on this economic opportunity and achieve zero-emission shipping, the clean maritime plan makes the following core commitments:
a call for evidence in 2020 on non-tax incentives to support the transition to zero emission shipping, as well as a consultation on how the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation could be used to encourage the uptake of low carbon fuels in maritime, and a green finance initiative for maritime, which will be launched at London International Shipping Week in September
a working group and study to identify and support potential UK zero-emission shipping clusters
government support for clean maritime innovation in the UK:
funding of £1.3 million to support clean maritime innovation through MarRI-UK
grant support for early stage research projects related to clean maritime
and a clean maritime award to celebrate leaders in the field of emissions reduction
a Maritime Emissions Regulation Advisory Service (MERAS), in place by 2020, to provide dedicated support to innovators using zero emission propulsion technologies.

The plan also contains a number of zero-emission shipping ambitions, outlining the government’s vision for the future of zero-emission shipping and the milestones that will need to be achieved to reach it.
This plan has been achieved through close cooperation between industry and government.
The Clean Maritime Council, an advisory body of key stakeholders from across the maritime sector, academia and government, worked alongside government to develop the strategy, and will continue to work with us to implement the commitments.
A full review of the clean maritime plan’s implementation will take place in 2022.
 
 Beaulieu River - Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour redevelopment
Added: 12 Jul 2019
Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour redevelopment

We’re excited to announce our plans for a major £2m redevelopment of Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour, extending the marina while preserving the unique character which makes it so special.

Bigger berths and more walk-ashore pontoons will be offered to keep pace with modern demands. The reconfiguration will offer the best possible service while keeping a similar look and feel to the existing yacht harbour.

To minimise disruption, the works have been scheduled to take place over the winters of 2019-2020 and 2020-2021.

Please note we will have limited visitor availability during the first stage of works and from 23rd September 2019 until the end of March 2020 only swinging moorings will be available.

Beaulieu Enterprises Managing Director Russell Bowman said:
“The proposals represent a significant investment in the future of the Beaulieu River and are an important part of ensuring that it remains one of the most desirable places to visit and moor a yacht.
“We recognise that the Beaulieu River is a very special place and are committed to undertaking the project in a sensitive and sustainable way. Its unique character remains of paramount importance to us for its future.

“The reconfiguration will offer the best possible service for our customers, while keeping a similar look and feel to the existing yacht harbour.”
 
 Adler and Allan first organisation accredited by International Spill Accreditation Scheme
Added: 10 Jul 2019
UKHMA Commercial members Adler & Allan are the first response organisation to be recognised by the International Spill Accreditation Scheme (ISAS) as an accredited third-party Tier 2 Oil Spill Response Organisation (OSRO) for sheltered / enclosed waters, coastal & large estuary and shoreline clean-up.

The accreditation demonstrates Adler and Allan’s preparedness to respond to marine spill events with multiple deployments.
Attachement: View Attached File
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 The Importance of Life Jackets
Added: 07 Jul 2019
11 people, who drowned in 2018, might be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. This is one of the main findings of this year’s MCA Casualty Review Panel.

The panel reviewed 22 fatalities from 2018 and agreed that 11 lives could have been saved if they had been wearing a lifejacket. This figure is slightly lower than last year’s figure of 13 lives (out of 27 fatalities).

In the twelve years that the panel has been meeting, is has recorded that 200 lives could have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

The majority of incidents last year involved commercial fishermen (including accidents at fish farms) and anglers, many of which happened in Scottish sea lochs.

The panel’s overriding advice was to wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid appropriate to your activity which is proven to greatly improve your chances of surviving the shock of entering cold water. The panel also recommended an additional package of measures to keep you safe for your activity.

Carrying a VHF DSC radio and knowing how to use it to contact the coastguard or other vessels carrying a personal location beacon or emergency position indicating radio beacon (PLB) or (EPIRB) will help rescuers to locate you and even if you’re unconscious the alarm will be raised.

Downloading the RYA SafeTrx app on your phone and using it in an emergency could make all the difference.
Wearing appropriate clothing and carrying the right safety equipment for your sport, particularly rock anglers and sport fishermen wading in slippery rivers.
Making sure your equipment is properly fitted, for example wearing a lifejacket with a crotch strap attached.
This advice comes after the panel looked at a case where a yachtsman died because he was wearing a lifejacket that was not properly fitted, had ridden up and was not keeping his head above water.

Maritime safety week is focusing on important safety issues such as lifejacket wear this year.
On Wednesday 3 July as part of this, Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani MP met with other ministers and the fishing industry to talk about fishing vessel safety.
 
 Autonomous Shipping Update
Added: 03 Jul 2019
Last year, the Ship Owners Club proudly launched a dedicated autonomous vessel P&I policy, the first of its kind in the world. The Club consulted owners, operators and manufacturers of autonomous vessels to ensure that we fully understood the needs of this specialist sector.

Since then, the Club has gained several new Members who are doing exciting and innovative things with autonomous technology. This article features two of those Members and their recent achievements.

mailto:info@shipownersclub.com?subject=Autonomous%20Vessels
Website: View External Website
 
 Maritime Safety Put into the Spotlight
Added: 02 Jul 2019
People who drink while boating will be the focus of a new government campaign to improve safety on the water.

The campaign, targeting recreational boaters, is part of the first Maritime Safety Action plan, published today (1 July 2019) by the Department for Transport.
It sets ambitious targets for reducing and eliminating preventable deaths, while also setting out the work the government and its agencies are already doing – marking the start of the inaugural Maritime Safety Week.

A consultation will also be held later this year on the safety of personal watercraft – such as jet skis – to ensure lives are not endangered by negligent users.

Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said:
Keeping people safe on or around water is at the heart of everything we do.
This plan is rightly ambitious in setting out how we will reduce the number of fatalities on our waterways as quickly as possible.
Our campaign will also reach those who don’t use boats that often, and who may need reminding of the risks they are taking when they drink and sail.

It is hoped that the first ever Maritime Safety Action Plan will help cut preventable fishing deaths by 2027 and half drowning by 2026.
Maritime Safety Week, which starts today, will focus on a number of different elements of safety on the water, including fishing vessel safety.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency has also pledged to carry out a review of its decision-making to ensure it follows recommendations set out by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch, which looks into the causes of fatalities at sea.

The plan comes as one of the first actions from Maritime 2050, which was published in January and is the government’s long-term strategy to keep the UK as a world leader in the sector for decades to come.
Website: View External Website
 
 Forthcoming rule changes which will affect the fishing industry
Added: 30 May 2019
A new post, “Forthcoming rule changes which will affect the fishing industry” has just been published.

An update on the upcoming changes to fisheries regulations to enable the fishing industry to prepare.

To read the new post: Click here


 
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Safety bulletinsMaritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Safety bulletins
Added: 28 May 2019
Provides alerts for safety issues for commercial and pleasure vessel operations.
Website: View External Website
 
Consultation: Class IX tugs under 500GT - guidance for exemption from the carriage of a rescue boat Consultation: Class IX tugs under 500GT - guidance for exemption from the carriage of a rescue boat
Added: 28 May 2019
Following preliminary consultations with UK tug owners/operators the MCA now seeks public consultation on a new Marine Guidance Notice titled: Class IX Tugs Under 500GT, which contains risk mitigations if a Class IX tug owner/operator wishes to be exempt from the statutory carriage of a rescue boat.

Responses are welcomed from 27/05/2019 until 21/06/2019.

Website: View External Website
 
Foreign flagged ships detained in the UK during April 2019Foreign flagged ships detained in the UK during April 2019
Added: 23 May 2019
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced today that four foreign flagged ships remained under detention in UK ports during April 2019 after failing port state control (PSC) inspection.
Website: View External Website
 
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Safety bulletinsMaritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Safety bulletins
Added: 23 May 2019
A summary of recent alerts for safety issues for commercial and pleasure vessel operations.
Website: View External Website
 

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Report 18/2018. Dragging anchor and subsequent collisions by general cargo vessel Celtic Spirit
Report16/2018: Unintentional release of carbon dioxide from fixed fire-extinguishing systems on ro-ro vessels Eddystone and Red Eagle
Report 3/2018, Safety warning about keel failures on sailing yachts
Report 14/2018: Catastrophic engine failure and fire on board ro-ro passenger ferry
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